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Trader’s Corner: It All Starts With Listening

My old man who passed away this past year taught me something smart about business. “Listen to what your client wants… then give it to them.”

You want to win your Dynasty League in the next couple of years? Follow that advice.

One of the lost arts of Fantasy Baseball is getting on the phone with your trading partner. Only on the phone can you hear your Partner/Opponent’s passions. If I send an email out to an owner in my league asking them who on their team they are less then excited about, I will get no information. If I am on the phone with the same guy, I can ask him if he would be willing to move Jon Lester or Matt Garza. He might respond with “No.. no.. Garza is my guy. Lester… not so much… he killed me last year.”

In that moment, I know that I can have Lester at a discount. That’s the guy I am looking to get. Why? Because my next call is to the owner who I know is a big believer in a Lester comeback.

Dynasty leagues are about accruing value at every turn, and the best way to do that is to give other players who they want.

Now if you are on this site that is dedicated to what I consider the most exciting, interesting and obsessive formats, then you are already in on what I consider to be the next dominant wave of Fantasy. In a Dynasty format, your season never ends. Even as your team tumbles in May, perhaps the most fun is about to be had. You must rebuild.

There is somebody out there who “wants to win NOW!” Maybe they have been playing the slow game for years… waiting for their kids to grow into the players they have become. Now they are close and they can smell the championship. Those clients have a want. Getting Derek Norris, Jonathan Singleton and an early second round pick (that turned into Max Fried), for Mike Napoli at the end of last season from an owner in the hunt in August? In a dynasty format? That feels as good as almost anything in fantasy baseball.

If you have your finger on the pulse of your league, every single day can be the trading deadline, and every single day is sitting down at the final table of the World Series Of Poker. Every decision you make in this format lasts for as long as you own your team. It’s like life… how good you are will be how good you’ll be.

So get on the phone. Talk to your other owners. They will tell you what they want. Give it to them. Accrue value. And win.

“If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.” – Milton Berle

Follow me on Twitter at @IanKahn.

The Author

Ian Kahn

Ian Kahn

5 Comments

  1. Stormin' Norman
    March 4, 2013 at 9:05 am

    I love this post because it’s exactly how I try to work things in my dynasty league of 3 years. I’ve probably made the most trades due to going to nearly every owner and figuring out what they need. Unfortunately, my team bombed y1 and y2, but now I have undoubtedly stocked my team full of young players that are on the precipice of breaking out AND a minor league squad that would make anyone blush (we’re talking the top 6 specs here on this website and 7 out of the top 10 since I traded Wheeler away). Love this post.

  2. Aussie Andrew
    March 4, 2013 at 3:27 pm

    Yes great post. The entusiasm oozes. Bring on the trades!!

  3. SpartanPower
    March 4, 2013 at 10:34 pm

    Owners like the ones in this article take a good dynasty league and make it into a great dynasty league. These owners are connecters that help bring everybody together. Great post Mr. Kahn, I look forward to more of these in the weeks to come.

  4. RotoRabbi
    March 4, 2013 at 11:41 pm

    You are right–successful traders don’t put themselves first while constructing a deal; they need to repeatedly craft win-win deals that they just happen to win a little more, more often than not. Thanks for sharing your insights!

  5. March 5, 2013 at 10:20 pm

    Great work Ian! Awesome article! Keep up the great work! Glad to have your great mind putting ideas on paper!!!!
    @MarkusPotter

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